Report: Solar Could Add $15,000 to Your Home Value

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Report: Solar Could Add $15,000 to Your Home Value

Citing an article from Daily Finance, solar panels could add a significant value to your home.

“In a study of home sales in eight states between 1999 and

Image courtesy of Ross Chandler

2013, the Berkeley Lab found that a solar power system was worth about $15,000 to home buyers, or about $4 per watt. That’s a significant addition in value[.]… Just remember that solar panels could save you money every month and add value to your home, but owning the system may have the most impact and make your home even more attractive to potential buyers.”

With the increase in environmentally conscious buyers, adding a solar system to a home is also a great option for builders looking to sell an eco-friendly building.

When you purchase a solar system, the study in this article and others show on average you will make your investment back if you were to sell your home.  Ailey Solar has partnered with Admiral’s Bank to offer third-party financing options that we are happy to discuss with you.


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ComEd Prices Increasing – Not for Solar Customers!

The Chicago Tribune notes ComEd is getting ready to increase prices again just in time for the summer.  Now would be the perfect time to switch to solar.  Choosing solar means no longer having to worry about price increases for your solar usage while you produce your own clean energy from your roof!

From the article:

Image courtesy of Michael Tercha/Chicago Tribune

“Starting June 1, Commonwealth Edison customers on average will see monthly bills jump 21 percent, to about $82 a month from about $69 a month.

City residents and others who have switched to competing suppliers won’t escape the higher prices because the cost of all electric power is higher.


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Forbes: Solar Costs Continue To Fall

Category : Solar Trends

From LBNL

Citing a report from the Lawrence Berkeley National Labs, Forbes explains that Solar PV’s costs have continued their historic price drop in 2012.

Costs continue to fall at a healthy clip, with the most recent year-over-year declines of 14% for systems less than 10 kilowatts (kW), […] Median installed prices were $5.3 [per Watt] […] LBNL attributes these declining U.S. prices mainly to falling module prices, which accounted for 80% of the total price drop.

Interestingly we have found that even in Illinois we can beat that median installed price.


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